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Keep Your Gas Meter Accessible and Free of Safety Hazards

posted Feb 5, 2013, 6:08 PM by Barry Relf

NOTE: If you smell natural gas or suspect a gas leak at any time, leave the area and call your gas utility company.

During the winter months, keep an eye on your outdoor natural gas meter, pressure regulator, gas piping and pressure relief valve. Every gas meter has a pressure relief valve which is a safety device used in gas lines to prevent an excess pressure build up. The valve will automatically vent gas to the atmosphere if pressures reach an unsafe level. It is important to keep this accessible, clear of snow and debris. 

Gas meter covered by snow

Tips to consider:

  • Never let snow completely cover your gas meter.
  • Do not shovel snow up against your gas meter.
  • Use caution when using a snow blower or snow plow near your gas meter.
  • Never kick or hit the gas meter or its piping to break away built-up snow or ice.
  • Remove icicles from your overhead eaves trough and watch for buildup of freezing rain or water dripping from the roof or eaves trough onto your meter.
  • Use a broom or your hands to gently clear snow and ice.
  • Accumulated snow places stress on your meter piping; damage to the piping could cause a gas leak.
  • Never pour hot water on the gas equipment to melt ice.
  • Don't try to chip the ice off the gas meter, because you could damage the meter and cause a gas leak.
  • Check the area around your gas meter regularly. If possible, maintain a path to your meter for emergency response personnel.
  • Be familiar with the location of your meter and its shut-off location.

 

The external vent pipes of furnaces, fireplaces, water heaters and clothes dryers should also be kept clear.

Consult your gas utility company for more information and safety tips.

 For a very detailed and professional Ottawa home inspection, call (613-799-3698) or email Barry at Inspection by 42 Home Inspections (barry@ib42.ca). We inspect homes in Kanata, Ottawa, Barrhaven, Orleans, Stittsville and surrounding areas.

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